Kristoffer Borgli

Sheffield Doc/Fest: Drib (2017)

There was an unusual draw to Drib, and I still cannot pinpoint what it was. Maybe it was the narrative that is so wrapped up in legal issues, that the director Kristoffer Borgli had to create a fictional energy drink brand just for the film.

At the centre of Drib is Borgli’s friend Amir Asghernejad, a comic from Oslo that went viral by getting people to beat him up. As a result of this and aggressive marketing, Amir was approached by an unnamed famous energy drink brand.

With the marketing world always wanting to be ahead of the curve and in the loop, they contacted Amir to become the star of the new ad campaign centred around his violent videos. However, due to the legality of retelling this story, Borgli created the fictional brand of Drib to retell Amir’s story. And he definitely had fun with it, even going as far as creating an awesome clothing brand (drib.us)

For the next 90 or so minutes, you are wrapped in the ridiculous five days that Amir spent with the marketing team. Borgli chose to fill these minutes with the unbelievably bizarre narrative, the perfect mix of comedy driven through Amir and it is all crafted with a purpose. Borgli’s craft and film knowledge is perfect, as Drib becomes a cinematic adventure with Amir in Los Angeles.

For me, the choice to have the narrative driven through a one-on-one interview with Amir and then recreating his story with Drib in place of this unnamed drinks brand was perfect. It allowed Borgli to exercise his knowledge of film language, but also allowed Amir to do what he does best, and be funny.

Due to the actual narrative and the direction Borgli takes us in, a question raised of whether this is actually the truth, or just a superbly played out ploy by Borgli. But that doesn’t take anything away from how enjoyable Drib actually is, as Borgli recounts Amir’s story with the unnamed energy drink company with the help of actors playing different roles, aside from Adam Pearson who plays himself.

The importance of Drib lies in the impact that marketing has, and the vice-grip that it can hold over someone through NDA’s (Non-disclosure Agreements) or the ridiculous extent some companies may go to just to achieve a ‘good’ marketing campaign. Drib will not go down in history as one of the great documentaries, but it will go down as one of the most interesting due to content but also the impressive use of film language.

It’s worth mentioning that Drib seemed to be an experimental film to some degree, with it blurring the lines of non-fiction and fiction, due to Borgli’s form of narrative telling. This is not helped by the questioning of whether this story it true or not, but after the ninety minutes are up, it doesn’t matter due to the enjoyment of Drib and Amir’s pretty implausible story.

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