the bomb

the bomb was another film that I managed to catch at Sheffield DocFest, but something struck a chord with me when watching it as I went back to see it again. (and again later on streaming service through DocFest) And I believe it comes down to sheer audio and visual experience that is the bomb.

It opens in the quite a bizarre way but remains strangely captivating, with a compilation of army parades whilst music pumps. What starts as innocent footage of army parade soon descends into the parading of vehicles and nuclear weapons that is at the disposal of the armies nowadays. But the opening sequence becomes quite seductive as the weapons of mass destruction are paraded whilst The Acid thumps in the background and finishes almost in celebratory fashion as snapshot footage of rockets being fired fills the screen.

As the scene changes, The Acid’s music becomes quite intoxicating as it drives the bomb from one scene to the next. It should be noted that the bomb doesn’t feature a traditional narrative, but rather a compilation of archival footage throughout the sixty minutes of running time, whilst The Acid back the footage with their music.

With the help of this archival footage, Eric Schlosser, Smriti Keshari and Kevin Ford bought to life this audio and visual experience about nuclear bombs. But what becomes the triumph within this film is that the awareness they are bringing to the forefront about the dangers of these bombs that isn’t necessarily common knowledge. This message isn’t forced down your throat either, but shows enough footage for the audience to engage in their own way.

Whilst the opening scene thumps away in this seductive way, the footage of the nuclear weapons failing contrasts that strongly. The failing weapons have an abundance of mishaps, from misfires to failing to stay the course and some even falling from the sky as they fail to take off. This contrast is really powerful, especially as it is a far sight from the innocent-looking parade captured earlier.

the bomb brings an awareness of the dangers of nuclear weapons, but the way in which this message is presented is the thing that stays with you. You are not force-fed information, but rather the visual and audio experience of the bomb really sticks with you. It’s structure is perfect as well as it shows the contrast from Oppenheimer creating the first bomb to the aftermath of the Japan bombing in the Second World War in some painstakingly striking footage.

Schlosser, Keshari and Ford, with the aid of this structure found a way to tell the story about nuclear weapons keeping it informative and enjoyable, but most importantly, thought-provoking.

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